Sunrise on a Crisp December Morning

Back in the early 1990s, I was working at a camera shop, developing film, printing photographs, taking pictures of the mall Santa Claus with kids and doing general duties of an assistant manager of a one-hour lab. I began working there because of my love of photography.

While I learned a lot about this area of the art, I wanted to expand my skill with my 35 mm camera. At that time, night courses were all the rage. I’m not sure if they are now, but even 15 years ago, they had been, and I had been an instructor on several of them.

Anyways, Dartmouth offered a wide-range of night courses for fall, winter and spring. This included photography. Ryerson Clark, who I believe lived in Halifax, was our instructor. I signed up for all three courses he offered, completing one then going onto the next.

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A Snowy Saturday in Pictures

Several inches of snow fell yesterday and into the overnight. Here is what New Scotland looks like on a snowy day. The morning was crisp at -14 degrees Celsius. That’s 6.8 degrees Fahrenheit.

The sun was just below the horizon and rising quickly.

Five minutes later, the sun crest the horizon and bathed the land in warm light.

The thick clouds sharpened the rays.

By the time I had fed the critters and started on my walk, the sun had risen behind the clouds, leaving the heavily-laden branches under grey skies.

The clouds were expansive and with lots of texture.

The donkeys were more interested in hay than they are in me.

The fresh snow revealed the many visitors that had passed through during the night, including one busy fox. Or maybe it was more than one. There were an awful lot of tracks along the trail, in and out of the woods, around the hayfield and through the donkey pasture.

Happy Saturday. Stay warm.

My Favourite Place to Hike: Liscomb River

The Liscomb River has everything a nature-lover desires. It’s long and cuts deep into the wilderness, providing the perfect spot to canoe, fish, camp, hunt and explore. Or to escape the rat race and to breathe fresh air that will zap your energy after spending the day in it. Sometimes it’s a wide, meandering river. Other times, it’s rapids and waterfalls. Still other times, it’s a salmon pool or a lake.

I’ve been exploring the Liscomb River all my life. It’s where I caught my first fish with my first rod. While it’s beautiful any time of the year, the autumn colours paint a colourful landscape.

Below is the Liscomb River in pictures on October 7, 1990, with a few photos taken in other years for comparison.

Indiana Jones Bridge

Yes, here it is. The bridge we call the Indiana Jones bridge. You can see why if you’ve watched the film Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.

While this one is sturdier and shorter than the one in the movie, if you’re the slightest bit fearful of heights, you will not want to cross it.

This 1990s version has more substance than the one that preceded it. I’ve been across all of those that existed in my lifetime.

This photograph was taken down stream of the bridge.

Just past the bridge up stream is the falls. It’s only about 15 feet in height but after heavy spring rains, it is gushing water like a raging river.

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Fall in My Garden

If spring can spring, does that mean fall can fall? If so, it has fallen in the Maritimes.

Yesterday was a beautiful day in my Nova Scotia garden. While temperatures reached 13 degrees Celsius, grey clouds consumed the sky, a thin veil of fog perched in the distance and a slow mist fell throughout the day, there was no wind. I worked outside all day in shorts and a light sweater.

Here are a few photos of my garden that captured the season.

Red Berries

High Bush Cranberry

I planted this bush several years ago because I love cranberries, and I wanted the ability to pick some from my yard. However, these berries taste nothing like the low-growing cranberries that grow in Nova Scotia. The berries taste horrible. I’ve tasted them before the frost, after the frost and after may frosts, but they still taste horrible. However, the birds enjoy them in winter.

Ninebark

This shrub has been growing in my garden for more than two decades. Last winter, I cut it back hard because it had grown lanky and wild. This summer, if filled out better than the first few years of it living in my garden.

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The Jodrey Trail and a Scene from Shadows in the Stone

Last summer, I hiked the Jodrey Trail, Blomidon Park, Nova Scotia. The entire hike provided breathtaking scenery, but there was one section that stood out above the rest for reasons others in the hiking group wouldn’t understand. While I’d never been on this trail before, I had explored it in my imagination.

Jodrey Hiking Trail Blomidon

Setting the scene

The vegetation was lush. Tall trees provided a thick canopy that trapped cool moisture and reflected the heat from the scorching temperatures of the hot July day. It also provided the perfect micro-environment for ferns and mosses to grow. Inhaling filled me with the wonderful aromas of the forest.

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Foggy Morning at Moon Meadow Croft

Late August in Nova Scotia provides cool nights (down to 12 degrees Celsius) and hot days (we reached 37 degrees today). These extreme temperatures create the perfect environment for thick morning fog and cobwebs.

Below are a two scenes captured early yesterday morning on my little homestead, Moon Meadow Croft.

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