In the Garden: Goals for 2021

In January, I set goals for the coming growing season in the garden. While I can’t dig in the frozen soil, I can plan what I’ll grow to become more self-sufficient.

Last year, my goal was to grow a year’s supply of herbs to use in my cooking. That was accomplished. In fact, I have more variety than I usually do. The herbs I grew, harvested and dried were rosemary, basil (green and purple), thyme, sage, summer savory and parsley (straight and curly)

I also grew and dried peppermint and lemon balm to use as a tea mix. Opening that bottle of peppermint and taking a deep breath, it smells like After Eight mints. Mmm.

2021 Garden Goals

This summer, I want to repeat my success and grow all the herbs I use in cooking. To this, I’m adding sweet marjoram and dill.

parsley, sage and thyme

An added goal is to grow several plants I can harvest and dry to make tea that will supply me for one year. This means I’ll grow and harvest more peppermint and lemon balm. To this list, I’ll add stevia (a natural sweetener), German chamomile, stinging nettle and fennel. I’ll also harvest some of the lavender flowers and raspberry leaves from the many plants I have.

While I’ll grow the foods I grew last summer, one specific goal is to grow 80 pounds of potatoes. Last year, I grew about 40 pounds. Yesterday, I ate the last of the potatoes grown in 2020. They still tasted great, even when eaten raw.

So far, I’ve already sown rosemary, an herb that take a long time to grow. By the time I’m ready to plant it outside, it should be about three inches tall. I’m experimenting with keeping last year’s plants alive in our cold winter, so hopefully, I’ll start the summer with a few mature plants already in the garden as well as new ones.

Happy gardening.

Selina Burkenshaw

Selina Burkenshaw

Human, herbalist, first appeared in chapter 10 of Shadows in the Stone

Selina Burkenshaw slowly poured the steaming tea into the mug. The mug full, she returned the pot to the stove top. Scooping a dollop of honey from the jar, she stirred it gently into the hot liquid. Once sufficiently mixed, she drew the warm spoon over her tongue to taste the sweetness. She picked up the mug and turned to her mate.

Farlan remained in the same position since he entered their dwelling. He rested in the chair near the stove watching their first-born sleep. Their daughter—barely one year old—brought him much joy, but even she could not break the spell he appeared to be under since his return from patrol two days earlier. The outing was supposed to be five days, but it lasted ten. As usual, he couldn’t share details of the excursion, but the permanent grimace and the solemn mood spoke volumes. His lack of chatter also hinted at the worry teasing his mind. She hadn’t seen him this distraught since the inquest into Lady Glynn Dasia’s murder.

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My tea mug comes from Newfoundland

NewfoundlandI love tea. It’s one—no, it is—my most favourite drink in the world. I like rum, cranberry juice, gin and wine, but I love tea. I love it so much that if I couldn’t make a good cup where I lived or have one shipped in, I’d move. I think I might survive a week—maybe seven days—without tea if I had one of my other likable drinks or hot chocolate, but that’s pushing it.

Coffee doesn’t factor into the equation.

Tea drinkers—I’ve found—are often in search of two best things: the best type of tea and the best vessel in which to drink it from.

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